Tag Archives: tactical

Battered by Battle tactical flashlights

Only at Battle Flashlights can you order one item, and get sold and charged for two!

Battle Flashlights
501 W Broadway, Ste A304
San Diego, CA 92101, United States
Phone: 1-855-454-6186
Email: support@battleflashlights.com

June 24, 2017: There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true, +1 means false, and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: -1.  Kudos to whoever wrote this copy for making an 800 to 1,000-lumen flashlight sound like a nuclear weapon.

  • Some users are afraid it will be regulated and sales of this item will be outlawed for civilian use.
  • “Paralysis strobe” technology.

Suspicious location: -1.  501 W Broadway, Ste A304, San Diego, CA 92101 is a mailbox. po

Onerous terms: -1

  • They’ll charge a 30% restocking fee on returns for refund or replacement.
  • They don’t guarantee that the flashlight is fit for any use; nor that anything they say is true.
  • You can’t sue them, join a class action that’s suing them, or join a group arbitration. If you somehow end up in court with them anyway, it has to be a court in San Diego, CA.

Ads, spam, robocalls: -1.

  • They’ll beam ads at you, spam, junk-mail, telephone and text you.  You can only partially opt out.
  • they’ll share your data with other companies that will do the same.
  • If they sell their company, your data is part of the deal.

Lying and deception: -1.

  • 200 times more powerful than a camera flash?  Battle Flashlight; 800-1,000 lumens.  Camera flash onto 1 square meter; 1.4 million lumens.
  • What’s included with your purchase?
    • 1x BATTLE FLASHLIGHTS flashlight – 800-1000 Lumens – 2000X Zoom
    • 1x Rechargeable Lithium Battery*
    • 1x Lightning Fast Wall-Charger*
    • 1x Lightning Fast Car-Charger*
    • 1x Luxurious Protective Case
    • 100% Rush Shipping NationWide!

A few paragraphs away, I found: * These items are optional and have an additional cost.

Obfuscation: -1.

  • hiddenCount-down timer on the second page implies that you don’t have enough time to make a careful decision.
  • They slip a second product into your package on page 3, doubling the money they’ll charge.  The total charge is in a light type-face, easy to overlook.

Phony reviews: -1

  • The first page of the web site poses as a review.
  • It includes several testimonials by people with no last names.

Crummy product: 0.  There’s no way to know.  Remember that you buy and pay for two products here.  One richly described flashlight, plus a “free” tactical kit, concealed until the third page, for which they charge an additional $20.

Overpriced: -1. Rhetorically they ask, “How are we able to offer this extraordinary flashlight for such a low price?”  By forcing you to also buy a second product.

75% discount: +1.  False; I think?  See “Bloopers” below.


Total score; -7

Unauthorized charges:  I found no reports of this.  Battle Flashlights does not accept PayPal.


Conclusion: Forget these guys; buy a flashlight at Home Depot.

Bloopers:  True!  We’ve hit the jackpot this time.

  • laughIt is already selling out all over The USA and Europe and has now landed in!
  • … this “military grade” flashlight has become very popular among both men and women from .
  • 1x Luxurious Protective Case.  Surely the copywriter is winking at us here.
  • Remember:(Our shipping network reaches every corner of with no exceptions!).
  • They can’t decide what their regular price is; and their arithmetic is hilarious.bloopers

Gulled by Gladiator tactical flashlights

I WAS going to buy & backed out of the screen … They went ahead & charged my card & shipped the order (WITH RUSH SHIPPING EXTRA) an added the upgraded package & signed me up for some club membership I didn’t want!

The above is from Frank in central Florida, replying to another post.  Gladiator Flashlights contact information:

10755 Scripps Poway Pkwy #360, San Diego, CA 92131 USA
support@gladiatorflashlights.com
1-844-769-4088

It’s June 11, 2017.  There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true, +1 means false, and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: -1

  • Should this flashlight be banned from the public? It could be soon.”  This is from the Gadgets World public page on Facebook.  The real question is whether this scammer should be banned from the public.
  • These days, in a world where terrorism, and natural disasters are becoming the norm, it’s more important than ever to have the right tactical gear.”  As trade goods?
  • This light’s incredible LED technology is used by the U.S. Navy Seals, …” etc.  True, you don’t see many incandescent light bulb flashlights these days.

Suspicious location: -1.  10755 Scripps Poway Pkwy #360, San Diego, CA 92131 USA is a mailbox.po

Onerous terms: -1

  • ***ALL SALES ARE FINAL***  (this may be why I found no guarantee period or terms).
  • ALL refunds or warranty replacements will be subject to a 30% restocking fee.
  • Products are sold on a one-time and subscription basis.”  I gather from Frank’s experience that subscription is the default sale plan.
  • You can cancel your subscription any time, but they won’t give your money back.
  • Even if you never use the products you receive, you have to pay for them.
  • Reversing their charges on your credit card is “theft.”
  • They don’t guarantee that the flashlight is fit for any use; nor that anything they say is true.
  • You can’t sue them, join a class action that’s suing them, or join a group arbitration.

Ads, spam, robocalls: -1

  • They’ll beam ads at you, email, robocall and text you.  You can only partially unsubscribe.
  • They’ll share your data with other companies that will do the same.
  • If they sell their company, your data is part of the deal.

Lying and deception: -1.  From the complaints I’ve read, it’s clear that the Terms and Conditions omit important information, such as how to make a purchase without a subscription.

Obfuscation: -1

  • You have to drill down thru three pages to find out the price.
  • Count-down timer to make you think you don’t have enough time for a careful decision.

Phony reviews: -1.  I particularly enjoyed this line from TVStuffReviews.com; “The company stresses that not only is the product of our product with the business and the service offered is much better.

Crummy product: 0.  This looks like the usual low-end tactical flashlight; some people are satisfied with it, others not.

  • Frank wrote “Wasn’t exactly what I wanted, I got most of my money back & got to keep their flashlight package none the less. Surprisingly the flashlight works great! Lol
  • The Better Business Bureau has this complaint; “I Do NOT want there BOGUS FLASHLIGHT that their Video Shows its as BRIGHT as SUN but in REALITY the flashlight is just a plain flashlight…I WANT a 100 PERCENT REFUND and I Want NOTHING to Do with this Company EVER AGAIN.

Overpriced: +1.  False.  Gladiator is asking $20.  Amazon carries the Gladiator LT600 flashlight, which sure looks like the same light, for $30.

75% discount: -1.  True.


Total score; -7

Unauthorized charges: CREDIT CARD RISK ALERT.  If you enter your credit card number on the order form, the scammer will put a charge on it immediately even if you don’t click “process.”  In addition to Frank’s experience, I see many complaints on the Better Business Bureau about being charged more than advertised for the flashlight and being charged a monthly membership fee for a club the customers didn’t join.  Gladiator does not accept PayPal.


Conclusion: It’s not worth even a good flashlight to let these scammers glom onto your credit card data.

Blooper:

Whacked by Primitive Survivors CorePak kit

Primitive Survivors CorePak; this box of trinkets gives about as much protection as a camo bikini.

It’s May 30, 2017.  There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true, +1 means false, and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: -1.

  • Made to address key needs when it comes to surviving and protecting yourself.
  • This kit contains all the tools and equipment anyone would need for camping, hiking, excursions and surviving in the wilderness!” enthuses The Tactical Pros with less restraint.

Let’s say you walk out the door with your Primitive Survivors CorePak in your pocket and head for the woods.  How well-prepared are you?  Let’s compare the Corepak’s contents to the time-tested 10 Essentials list of items to carry for survival in a wilderness:

  1. Navigation; detailed map, compass  /
  2. Water, and/or a way to purify water O
  3. Food O
  4. Clothing; protection from rain, insulating layers O
  5. Fire; a source of flame plus fire-starter material  /
  6. Outdoorsman’s first aid kit O
  7. Tools; knife/multitool, duct tape  X
  8. Flashlight/headlamp, spare batteries  X
  9. Sun protection; sunglasses, sunscreen  O
  10. Shelter; tarp/space blanket  O

CorePak items that didn’t make the list; whistle, tactical pen.  Also a box that wastes space and is extra weight for you to carry.  They might at least have formed the box into something useful like a mirror.

Suspicious location: -1.  1863 Pioneer Pkwy E Suite 222 Springfield, OR 97477 is a mailbox.falcon

Onerous terms: -1

  • If you return the product unused in its unopened package, they charge a 20% restocking fee.
  • If you return the product in an opened package, they charge a 25% restocking fee — if they accept it.
  • You pay the return shipping.  The Better Business Bureau has this complaint; “This company is completely unfair to expect a customer to pay return shipping on a broken item that i didnt break but rather arrived broken.
  • They don’t accept the return of clearance items.  (Everything in the CorePak is marked down; so it might be treated as a clearance item.)
  • They don’t guarantee that their products are fit for any use; nor that anything they say is true.

Ads, spam, robocalls: +1.  This doesn’t look like a problem.  “All the ways we reach out to customers are through people who have opted into our list and are interested in our products,” writes CEO Charlie Deleon Guerrero.  “Occasionally we send out newsletter promotions from sponsored companies, but we follow all can spam compliance with this and take opt-out unsubscribing requests very seriously.”

Lying and deception: +1.  None found.

Obfuscation: -1.  The terms and policy documents are entirely in upper case, making them hard to read.  And they’re way too long.

Phony reviews: -1.  Fake review sites.

Crummy product: -1.  True.

Overpriced: 0.  Probably; but there’s nothing to compare it to.

75% discount: -1.  True.


Total score; -4

Unauthorized charges: I found no reports of this.


Conclusion: Put together your own 10 Essentials kit and keep it in a small daypack.

Gouged by Defender X tactical pens

If you want to write, you’d like a light, and you might need to fight, maybe a tactical pen is for you?

Let’s dig into Defender X (who sometimes just calls themselves “Defender”) with the sharp corners of our Scam-O-Meters and see what we uncover.  There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true, +1 means false, and 0 means undetermined.  I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: -1

  • These days, in a world where terrorism, and natural disasters are becoming the norm, it’s more important than ever to have the right tactical gear.
  • Groundbreaking technology” is used by uniformed services.  Would that be the built-in flashlight?
  • If you’re lost in the woods, you can take notes as to your position or mark landmarks, etc.advises Bold Survivalist.

Suspicious location: -1.  Defender X is really Shadowhawk.  These two mailboxes are also used by known scammer Shadowhawk.  The Terms and Conditions confirm the relationship.

  • Corporate; 7582 Las Vegas Blvd. S #115-405, Las Vegas, NV 89123
  • Returns; 7875 Highlands Village Place, Suite B102 #401, San Diego, CA 92129

Onerous terms: 0.  I’ve seen much worse, so I’m cutting them some slack.  However,

  • If you reverse their credit card charge, that’s theft.
  • They don’t guarantee that the pen is fit for any use.
  • You can’t sue them, join a class action that’s suing them, or join a group arbitration.

Ads, spam, robocalls: -1

  • They’ll use the information you give them plus all they can suck out of your browser to beam ads at you and spam you.
  • They’ll share it with other companies that will do the same.
  • You can unsubscribe from individual mailing lists.
  • If they sell their company, your information is part of the deal.

Lying and deception: -1.  Would you give a liar your credit card?

  • Developed “in collaboration with law enforcement professionals.”  But one of the pictured pens is available thru Alibaba in lots of 10 or more.
  • Officers stated in interviews said that the most important tool you can carry is the item that happens to be in your hand, which more often turns out to be a pen.”  But the consensus on officer.com is that tactical pens are ridiculous.  “Yeah, you can cause some damage with it but if you are stabbing someone as an LEO it’s a lethal force situation, and your not stopping a dedicated attacker with a superficial stab wound.  …How much time are you willing to dedicate to training for what is, IMO, an inferior option to those things you already know how to do and are trained on by your department?

Obfuscation: -1

  • Careful on the order form; it’s pre-filled for a quantity of five pens ($145).
  • Once you go to the order form your browser’s back button is disabled.

Phony reviews: -1.  Featured testimonials and fake review sites.

Crummy product: 0.  Unknown.  Keep in mind that a scam may involve a good product.

Overpriced: -1.  Defender X asks $56 for one pen.  Amazon offers what sure looks like the same pen for $18.

75% discount: -1.  True.


Total score; -8

Unauthorized charges: Defender X inherits Shadowhawk’s CREDIT CARD RISK ALERT.  The Better Business Bureau rates Shadowhawk “F” with over 200 complaints; as of February 2017 they were up to their old tricks.  “I had 2 $8.95 a month charges come from 2 different companies monthly for a “Membership” for items monthly. I never received anything nor did I knowingly sign up for the membership,posted Jameison A.  An ominous sign; Defender X doesn’t accept PayPal.


Conclusion: I think the main advantage of a tactical pen is showing it off to your buddies.  There’s nothing wrong with this.  But don’t get entangled with these scammers; buy one at a store or on Amazon.

Bonus outtake:  The order form has pictures of totally different pens.difflaugh

Sunburned by Atomic Beam USA tactical flashlights

This is a cheaply built product, that has been aggressively marketed,” writes Joe on BrightReviews. “Based upon my experience, I would suggest buyers to beware!”

Let’s turn the harsh light of the Scam-O-Meter on TeleBrands’ Atomic Beam USA flashlight.  (They also sell lanterns, headlamps, battery chargers and many other products.). There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true, +1 means false, and 0 means undetermined.

Ridiculous claims: -1.  Forty times as powerful as an ordinary flashlight.  It’s safe to assume that by “ordinary” they mean an incandescent bulb flashlight from a museum.

Suspicious location: +1.  At 79 Two Bridges Road, Fairfield, NJ 07004 I see a very nice facility.hq

Onerous terms: 0.  The terms are better than those offered by many sellers, so I’ll cut them a little slack.  However,

  • To get a refund, you must return the light within 30 days of receiving it.  It must be in “like new” condition, in its original packaging, including all the stuff that came with it.
  • You can’t sue them, join a class action that’s suing them, or join a group arbitration.
  • Once they process your payment, they won’t cancel your order.

Ads, spam, robocalls: -1

  • They’ll use the information you give them to beam ads at you.
  • They’ll share it with other companies that will do the same.
  • If they sell their company, your information is part of the deal.

Lying and deception: -1

  • TeleBrands measures the power of their flashlight in Lux, claiming up to 5,000 lux.  All other flashlight sellers measure their products’ power in Lumens.  This makes comparing flashlights quite inconvenient.  
  • Lux is also a deceptive measure, because by itself it’s incomplete.  While Lumens is a measure of the light produced by the source, Lux is a measure of the light the source casts on a given surface area at a specified distance from the source and a specified angle relative to it.  Without the values of these variables, Lux means nothing.
  • Careful; the order forms are pre-filled for a quantity of two products.

Obfuscation: +1. None found.

Phony reviews: +1.  None found.

Crummy product: 0.  As far as I can tell, it’s a typical low-end tactical flashlight.  Wired rates it “Very good, but not quite great.”  Freakin’ Reviews writes, “While there is nothing particularly wrong with Atomic Beam, there isn’t much unique about it to make this a superior choice than other tac lights which cost the same or less.

Overpriced: -1.  TeleBrands is asking $20 for one flashlight, including AAA batteries.  Freakin’ Reviews notes that this was formerly advertised as a 1200-lumen flashlight.  Amazon sells Atomic Beam USA for $18, but offers what looks like the same 1200-lumen flashlight for $9.

75% discount: +1.  False.


Total score; 0

Unauthorized charges: The combination of bad service and billing irregularities leads me to rate this company as a CREDIT CARD RISK ALERT despite their relatively high Scam-O-Meter score.

  • The Better Business Bureau rates TeleBrands D+ with many negative reviews and complaints.
  • PissedConsumer has numerous complaints.  Here’s one; “I ordered a “get up and go cane” from Telebrands.They called to tell me it shipped.  Then they told me they added costume jewelry- earrings to the shipment at no additional charge. Then they told me that they included a necklace and would bill me an additional $39.99. I refused the entire box… including the cane.
  • RipoffReport likewise has lots of complaints, such asBecause he wanted to keep my business, he offered to take $10 off the order which he stated was $47.97 and would sell it to me for $37.97 – which is the original amount on my printed invoice!

Conclusion: Avoid.  Despite the unusual web presentation, the products are nothing special.  Too many people have had trouble with these guys.

 

Tagged by Tacticult Phantom P1 green laser

Tacticult looks like an okay outfit.  Is it?

Keep in mind that I’m not talking about illegal advertising; I’m talking about signs that a seller is a scammer (someone who takes your money by trickery or theft). I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true, +1 means false, and 0 means undetermined.

Ridiculous claims: 0.  “Aircraft aluminum” (the stuff beer cans are made of).  But that’s it for ridiculous; so I’ll give them a pass.

Suspicious location: -1.  Buried in the Terms of Service I found PO BOX 16466 Saint Paul MN, a mailbox (obviously).

Onerous terms: -1

  • You have just 7 days from the day you receive it to return the laser if you don’t like it.
  • You have 30 days to return it if it’s defective.  They charge a 20% restocking fee.
  • They don’t guarantee that anything they say is true.

Ads, spam, robocalls: +1.  They only send marketing emails if you opt in; and you can opt out.

Lying and deception: -1.  A 30-day “100% satisfaction guarantee” is advertised.  But the Terms describe a 7-day satisfaction guarantee.  The 30-day guarantee is a “free from defects” warranty.  They charge a 20% restocking fee; what, then, does 100% mean?

Obfuscation: -1

  • Countdown timer to make you think you don’t have time to make a careful decision.
  • “Spin the wheel” game to get a coupon that you can only use for the next 10 minutes; more pressure to decide quickly.

Phony reviews: +1.  None found.

Crummy product:  0.  I found no information — sorry!

Overpriced: 0.  I couldn’t find any similar products.  Most small lasers seem to be either presentation pointers or gunsights.  Here’s a $18 laser pointer on Amazon that you can also use to tease your cat.

75% discount: +1.  False.


Total score; -1

Unauthorized charges: I found no reports of this. Tacticult accepts PayPal.

Conclusion: Almost OK.  The guarantee terms are harsh, and different than advertised.

Lacerated by Ultrabeam lasers

…then i discovered that lasers are dangerous and cannot be used for the purposes they state,” writes Nick, a guy in Puerto Rico who likes tactical stuff.

… I used them intermittently at the wall, but i hurted my eyes and i still has spots in my vision.  ..Could you investigate the sites?”  Sure, I’ll do a request!  On April 30, 2017 let’s focus the clean white light of the Scam-O-Meter on the company that’s selling Ultrabeam, Official Tactical Kit.  (What’s official about it?)

Keep in mind that I’m not talking about illegal advertising; I’m talking about signs that a seller is a scammer (someone who takes your money by trickery or theft). I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true, +1 means false, and 0 means undetermined.

Ridiculous claims: -1.  OTK describes the device as a “Maximum legal wattage survival laser.”  How would it help you to survive?  They give three examples.  Igniting match-heads and popping balloons we can dispense with.  “Can be seen for over two miles” is the third example.  That might possibly be a little helpful.  But we’ll revisit this statement in “Lying and Deception” below.

Suspicious location: -1.  9265 S. Highland Drive #901401, Sandy, UT 84093.  It’s a Post Office box.po

Onerous terms: -1.

  • To return a product for a refund, you have to send it unopened to OTK within 10 days of the day you ordered it — not the day you received it.
  • They charge a $35 restocking fee — nearly the price of the laser.
  • They don’t guarantee that their products are fit for any use; nor that anything they say is true.
  • You can’t sue them or join a class action that’s suing them.

Ads, spam, robocalls: 0.  The Privacy Policy is too vague to tell whether you would be subject to aggressive advertising.

Lying and deception: -1.

  • OTK describes the device as a “Maximum legal wattage survival laser.”  But there is no legal limit on laser wattage, other than for presentation laser pointers.  OTK neglects to say what the laser’s wattage actually is.
  • OTK claims that the beam is visible for over two miles.  The Symthic forum has a post reporting the results of laser detectability range tests.  At best, lasers are detectable at a range of 50 meters (about 0.03 miles).
  • The order form is pre-filled for a quantity of three lasers ($110).

Obfuscation: -1.

  • Important links and information are camouflaged at the bottom of the web page.camo1camo2* Only one case and one pair of safety glasses will be provided for free. If you purchase multiple units they will be shipped in one case and with one pair of free safety glasses, unless you opt for aluminum cases on the next page.

PRIVACY STATEMENT | TERMS OF SERVICE | CONTACT US

  • A countdown timer suggests that you don’t have time to make a careful decision.
  • The Terms and Conditions are padded with extensive, useless text about third-party legal services to make them harder to read.

Phony reviews: +1.  None found.

Crummy product: 0.  I could find no unbiased information about the laser.

Overpriced: 0.  One laser with no battery is $59 when I add in the shipping.  I couldn’t find a similar laser elsewhere.

75% discount: 0.  It’s 70%, so I’ll give them a pass.

Total score; -4.

Unauthorized charges: I found no reports of this.

Conclusion: Steer clear.  The terms are oppressive, and camouflaging information doesn’t make for trust.  The laser seems to have no purpose.  Implicit, of course, is the notion that you could use it as a weapon.  And Nick’s experience supports this idea.  I’m not going to score OTK for something they didn’t say.

laugh

Bonus outtake:bo