Tag Archives: Primitive Survivor

Whacked by Primitive Survivors CorePak kit

Primitive Survivors CorePak; this box of trinkets gives about as much protection as a camo bikini.

It’s May 30, 2017.  There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true, +1 means false, and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: -1.

  • Made to address key needs when it comes to surviving and protecting yourself.
  • This kit contains all the tools and equipment anyone would need for camping, hiking, excursions and surviving in the wilderness!” enthuses The Tactical Pros with less restraint.

Let’s say you walk out the door with your Primitive Survivors CorePak in your pocket and head for the woods.  How well-prepared are you?  Let’s compare the Corepak’s contents to the time-tested 10 Essentials list of items to carry for survival in a wilderness:

  1. Navigation; detailed map, compass  /
  2. Water, and/or a way to purify water O
  3. Food O
  4. Clothing; protection from rain, insulating layers O
  5. Fire; a source of flame plus fire-starter material  /
  6. Outdoorsman’s first aid kit O
  7. Tools; knife/multitool, duct tape  X
  8. Flashlight/headlamp, spare batteries  X
  9. Sun protection; sunglasses, sunscreen  O
  10. Shelter; tarp/space blanket  O

CorePak items that didn’t make the list; whistle, tactical pen.  Also a box that wastes space and is extra weight for you to carry.  They might at least have formed the box into something useful like a mirror.

Suspicious location: -1.  1863 Pioneer Pkwy E Suite 222 Springfield, OR 97477 is a mailbox.falcon

Onerous terms: -1

  • If you return the product unused in its unopened package, they charge a 20% restocking fee.
  • If you return the product in an opened package, they charge a 25% restocking fee — if they accept it.
  • You pay the return shipping.  The Better Business Bureau has this complaint; “This company is completely unfair to expect a customer to pay return shipping on a broken item that i didnt break but rather arrived broken.
  • They don’t accept the return of clearance items.  (Everything in the CorePak is marked down; so it might be treated as a clearance item.)
  • They don’t guarantee that their products are fit for any use; nor that anything they say is true.

Ads, spam, robocalls: +1.  This doesn’t look like a problem.  “All the ways we reach out to customers are through people who have opted into our list and are interested in our products,” writes CEO Charlie Deleon Guerrero.  “Occasionally we send out newsletter promotions from sponsored companies, but we follow all can spam compliance with this and take opt-out unsubscribing requests very seriously.”

Lying and deception: +1.  None found.

Obfuscation: -1.  The terms and policy documents are entirely in upper case, making them hard to read.  And they’re way too long.

Phony reviews: -1.  Fake review sites.

Crummy product: -1.  True.

Overpriced: 0.  Probably; but there’s nothing to compare it to.

75% discount: -1.  True.


Total score; -4

Unauthorized charges: I found no reports of this.


Conclusion: Put together your own 10 Essentials kit and keep it in a small daypack.

Cyclopsed by Primitive Survivors TL900 headlamps

Theres is a strange company i brought headlamps from that i find very expensive i brought 3 headlamps falling in to the “buy more than one so the price lowers” trap and the batteries which they sell separately. …”  This from Nick, a Puerto Rican resident.  In addition to the chicanery that web scammers put their American victims thru, he had to deal with obstacles to international payment, shipping and legal recourse.

On April 8, 2017 let’s turn the lights on Primitive Survivors. There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true, +1 means false, and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: -1

  • “Use the strobe setting to disorient and confuse your opponent,” advises paid shill TL900.com.
  • 75% discount; read “WE ARE SCAMMERS.”

Post Office box: -1.  True.poCorporate headquarters; 1863 Pioneer Pkwy E Suite 222 Springfield, OR 97477.

Onerous terms: -1

  • To get a refund, you must obtain an authorization number and return the product within 30 days of receiving it.  If you return it in the original, unopened package (meaning you can’t test it), they’ll only charge a 20% restocking fee. Otherwise, the restocking fee is 25%–if they choose to accept the item.  They won’t except damaged products.
  • They don’t guarantee that the product is fit for any use; nor that anything they say is true.

Ads, spam, robocalls: +1.  This doesn’t look like a problem.  “All the ways we reach out to customers are through people who have opted into our list and are interested in our products,” writes CEO Charlie Deleon Guerrero.  “Occasionally we send out newsletter promotions from sponsored companies, but we follow all can spam compliance with this and take opt-out unsubscribing requests very seriously.”

Lying and deception: -1.

  • The order form is pre-filled for a quantity of five headlamps ($150), two of which are “free.”
  • A Better Business Bureau complaint says “No where in the advertising does it tell the buyer that these special type batteries and charger are not included. this leaves the item completely useless without the batteries.”  I saw no mention of this in the webpages or video. Nick wrote about this too.  Apparently, they don’t reveal it until they have your credit card number. They charge an additional $28 for a battery.
  • Nick wrote “When i told them to cancel my order, instead of cancelling they applied a 50% discount because its their policy.”  But their Terms document includes no such policy.

Obfuscation: -1

  • Terms and privacy policy documents are in upper case so they’ll be hard to read.
  • They advertise free shipping today only, to make you think you don’t have time to make a careful decision.

Phony reviews: -1.  The usual collection of paid shills, tho several claim hands-on experience.  “Most people stay away from LED head gear because they’re notorious for being bulky and heavy,” starts out Prepping Pros.  According to an Amazon review, so is this one.

Crummy product:  0.  Unbiased previews are hard to find. I see no consensus among the eight Amazon reviewers.  The five star reviews aren’t very convincing.

Overpriced: -1.  Primitive Survivors is asking $59, and I’m not sure you get a battery with it.  Here’s a similar headlight on Amazon for $18, battery included.  Rated 4.3 stars by 68 buyers.

Unauthorized charges: 0.  One BBB complainer wrote, “… the order page confirmed automatically without my consent …”  I’ve found no other reports of this.

Final score: -6

Go to REI and ask a knowledgeable salesperson to show you some headlamps. Forget about using one in combat.

Bonus outtakes:

  • Choosing the best product is very annoying if you are a great deal of options. In fact, from now on, you do not have to experience this stage have selected a convincing flagship called TL900 Headlamp,” enthuses Health Supplement Reviews.
  • This light is carp,warns an Amazon customer.