Tag Archives: phony

Why reading featured reviews gets you nowhere

Some scam sites have phony reviews right in the site. How convenient! Now you don’t even have to google for reviews.

But how familiar some of the reviewer’s faces look. Let’s track the career of one reviewer named Raymond — or is it Jim?

rePrime:raymond rvw

 

 

 

 

 

Inspire: Jim rvw

 

 

Ryan Leech Connection: john rvw

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GreyAtom.com: gregory rvw

This last review is heartless.  How many hopeful GreyAtom graduates will be trying to send their resumes to this nonexistent guy at MySite?

Okay, I haven’t begun to scratch Raymond’s portfolio and I’m tired. His portrait has been used as a credibility prop in dozens of websites under dozens of names. Save his photo to a file, do a Google image search with that file and see for yourself.

Thanks, Raymond, for helping to unearth a huge trove of web scammer sites for me to expose in this blog.  Good job!

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Why googling for reviews gets you nowhere

WivesGoWild.com is what you think it is–in Britain. What a fun fun-loving nation the British are. I noticed it among the enterprises going on at the Minneapolis scam factory. I was googling for usages of their address, 225 Thomas Ave. N. Suite R – Minneapolis MN 55405 when I stumbled across this one:wgw prv

The site is oDigger, a market place and message board for the web scam industry. This is what’s known in the business as an “offer“–that is, an advertising/sales campaign that’s up for grabs.  If you follow the link, you’ll see the Military Supply USA tactical flashlight offer that I recently reviewed.  What happened to the wild wives?  offerMy theory is that the Minneapolis scam factory put up this piece as an example of their workmanship. I expect that if there are any takers, they’ll create something along these lines, only with wives instead of flashlights.  Let’s look at the left sidebar.

This offer is being floated by the CBATrend network. The payout line tells much.  “CPA” stands for “cost per action”–that is, the the money the advertiser (who might be a web scammer) pays to the publisher (read “Reviewer“) for each of you who perform some action, such as registering on WivesGoWild.com.  In this case, $2.10.  There are other payment arrangements, such as “cost per click.”

Now I reveal my true identity as a retired IT specialist. I can’t explain something without drawing a diagram!review business

If only i’d been born clever enough, instead of blogging about web scams I could become part of this industry without having to buy and sell flashlights or anything else from AliBaba.com. All I’d have to do is sign up for offers on a network and write happy reviews about them. I read a post in oDigger by one “Publisher” who bragged about making $10,000 dollars a month doing this.

Armed with this information, we can Google for reviews of, say, Alumitact flashlights with eyes open!

I’ll bet you can spot the publishers here now. Be suspicious of pages with headings like “Is it a scam?” or “The truth about …”  These publishers figure that you’ve just been looking at a promotion for some product, and you’re interested–but cautious. You’ve decided to google for some reviews. They’re letting you know that, if you’re a doubter, theirs is the page to read.  You won’t find anything negative on those publishers‘ pages. Just a lot of hype and a lot of links to the web scammer’s site.

You can find links to real reviews this way too.  You just have to be careful!  Or you can always shop on Amazon.


Full disclosure; wordPress is a platform for publishers. I get to do this blog for free because some network that I have nothing to do with is sticking ads on the bottoms of my posts. I sure hope they aren’t for tactical flashlights or wild wives.