Category Archives: Reviews

Battered by Battle tactical flashlights

Only at Battle Flashlights can you order one item, and get sold and charged for two!

Battle Flashlights
501 W Broadway, Ste A304
San Diego, CA 92101, United States
Phone: 1-855-454-6186
Email: support@battleflashlights.com

June 24, 2017: There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true, +1 means false, and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: -1.  Kudos to whoever wrote this copy for making an 800 to 1,000-lumen flashlight sound like a nuclear weapon.

  • Some users are afraid it will be regulated and sales of this item will be outlawed for civilian use.
  • “Paralysis strobe” technology.

Suspicious location: -1.  501 W Broadway, Ste A304, San Diego, CA 92101 is a mailbox. po

Onerous terms: -1

  • They’ll charge a 30% restocking fee on returns for refund or replacement.
  • They don’t guarantee that the flashlight is fit for any use; nor that anything they say is true.
  • You can’t sue them, join a class action that’s suing them, or join a group arbitration. If you somehow end up in court with them anyway, it has to be a court in San Diego, CA.

Ads, spam, robocalls: -1.

  • They’ll beam ads at you, spam, junk-mail, telephone and text you.  You can only partially opt out.
  • they’ll share your data with other companies that will do the same.
  • If they sell their company, your data is part of the deal.

Lying and deception: -1.

  • 200 times more powerful than a camera flash?  Battle Flashlight; 800-1,000 lumens.  Camera flash onto 1 square meter; 1.4 million lumens.
  • What’s included with your purchase?
    • 1x BATTLE FLASHLIGHTS flashlight – 800-1000 Lumens – 2000X Zoom
    • 1x Rechargeable Lithium Battery*
    • 1x Lightning Fast Wall-Charger*
    • 1x Lightning Fast Car-Charger*
    • 1x Luxurious Protective Case
    • 100% Rush Shipping NationWide!

A few paragraphs away, I found: * These items are optional and have an additional cost.

Obfuscation: -1.

  • hiddenCount-down timer on the second page implies that you don’t have enough time to make a careful decision.
  • They slip a second product into your package on page 3, doubling the money they’ll charge.  The total charge is in a light type-face, easy to overlook.

Phony reviews: -1

  • The first page of the web site poses as a review.
  • It includes several testimonials by people with no last names.

Crummy product: 0.  There’s no way to know.  Remember that you buy and pay for two products here.  One richly described flashlight, plus a “free” tactical kit, concealed until the third page, for which they charge an additional $20.

Overpriced: -1. Rhetorically they ask, “How are we able to offer this extraordinary flashlight for such a low price?”  By forcing you to also buy a second product.

75% discount: +1.  False; I think?  See “Bloopers” below.


Total score; -7

Unauthorized charges:  I found no reports of this.  Battle Flashlights does not accept PayPal.


Conclusion: Forget these guys; buy a flashlight at Home Depot.

Bloopers:  True!  We’ve hit the jackpot this time.

  • laughIt is already selling out all over The USA and Europe and has now landed in!
  • … this “military grade” flashlight has become very popular among both men and women from .
  • 1x Luxurious Protective Case.  Surely the copywriter is winking at us here.
  • Remember:(Our shipping network reaches every corner of with no exceptions!).
  • They can’t decide what their regular price is; and their arithmetic is hilarious.bloopers

Gulled by Gladiator tactical flashlights

I WAS going to buy & backed out of the screen … They went ahead & charged my card & shipped the order (WITH RUSH SHIPPING EXTRA) an added the upgraded package & signed me up for some club membership I didn’t want!

The above is from Frank in central Florida, replying to another post.  Gladiator Flashlights contact information:

10755 Scripps Poway Pkwy #360, San Diego, CA 92131 USA
support@gladiatorflashlights.com
1-844-769-4088

It’s June 11, 2017.  There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true, +1 means false, and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: -1

  • Should this flashlight be banned from the public? It could be soon.”  This is from the Gadgets World public page on Facebook.  The real question is whether this scammer should be banned from the public.
  • These days, in a world where terrorism, and natural disasters are becoming the norm, it’s more important than ever to have the right tactical gear.”  As trade goods?
  • This light’s incredible LED technology is used by the U.S. Navy Seals, …” etc.  True, you don’t see many incandescent light bulb flashlights these days.

Suspicious location: -1.  10755 Scripps Poway Pkwy #360, San Diego, CA 92131 USA is a mailbox.po

Onerous terms: -1

  • ***ALL SALES ARE FINAL***  (this may be why I found no guarantee period or terms).
  • ALL refunds or warranty replacements will be subject to a 30% restocking fee.
  • Products are sold on a one-time and subscription basis.”  I gather from Frank’s experience that subscription is the default sale plan.
  • You can cancel your subscription any time, but they won’t give your money back.
  • Even if you never use the products you receive, you have to pay for them.
  • Reversing their charges on your credit card is “theft.”
  • They don’t guarantee that the flashlight is fit for any use; nor that anything they say is true.
  • You can’t sue them, join a class action that’s suing them, or join a group arbitration.

Ads, spam, robocalls: -1

  • They’ll beam ads at you, email, robocall and text you.  You can only partially unsubscribe.
  • They’ll share your data with other companies that will do the same.
  • If they sell their company, your data is part of the deal.

Lying and deception: -1.  From the complaints I’ve read, it’s clear that the Terms and Conditions omit important information, such as how to make a purchase without a subscription.

Obfuscation: -1

  • You have to drill down thru three pages to find out the price.
  • Count-down timer to make you think you don’t have enough time for a careful decision.

Phony reviews: -1.  I particularly enjoyed this line from TVStuffReviews.com; “The company stresses that not only is the product of our product with the business and the service offered is much better.

Crummy product: 0.  This looks like the usual low-end tactical flashlight; some people are satisfied with it, others not.

  • Frank wrote “Wasn’t exactly what I wanted, I got most of my money back & got to keep their flashlight package none the less. Surprisingly the flashlight works great! Lol
  • The Better Business Bureau has this complaint; “I Do NOT want there BOGUS FLASHLIGHT that their Video Shows its as BRIGHT as SUN but in REALITY the flashlight is just a plain flashlight…I WANT a 100 PERCENT REFUND and I Want NOTHING to Do with this Company EVER AGAIN.

Overpriced: +1.  False.  Gladiator is asking $20.  Amazon carries the Gladiator LT600 flashlight, which sure looks like the same light, for $30.

75% discount: -1.  True.


Total score; -7

Unauthorized charges: CREDIT CARD RISK ALERT.  If you enter your credit card number on the order form, the scammer will put a charge on it immediately even if you don’t click “process.”  In addition to Frank’s experience, I see many complaints on the Better Business Bureau about being charged more than advertised for the flashlight and being charged a monthly membership fee for a club the customers didn’t join.  Gladiator does not accept PayPal.


Conclusion: It’s not worth even a good flashlight to let these scammers glom onto your credit card data.

Blooper:

Waxed by Marvel hearing aids

The doctor is not a doctor; and the guarantee is not a guarantee.  So it’s no surprise that Marvel hearing aids are not really hearing aids.

They are “Personal Sound Amplifiers” (PSA).  A PSA has the same relation to a hearing aid as off-the-rack reading glasses have to prescription glasses.  There are many manufacturers and models.  A PSA might be helpful, and they’re cheap enough to give them a try before going the more expensive prescription route.  My wife has been using a PSA (not Marvel) and her hearing loss is slight enough for it to be quite helpful.

Marvel hearing aids are sold by Bargain Club Sale:

  • 5173 Waring Rd #12, San Diego, CA 92120, United States
  • support@bargainclub.sale
  • 1-877-885-4114

It’s June 7, 2017.  There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true, +1 means false, and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: -1.  “The same quality found in high priced Hearing Aids for 90% less.”

Suspicious location: -1.  “Corporate” address 5173 Waring Rd #12, San Diego, CA 92120 is a mailbox.corporate

Onerous terms: -1

  • I found no mention of guarantee or warrantee terms?
  • They charge a 30% restocking fee for refunds and warrantee returns.
  • If you reverse their charge on your credit card, that’s “theft.”
  • They don’t guarantee that the hearing aid is fit for any use; nor that anything they say is true.
  • You can’t sue them, join a class action that’s suing them, or join a group arbitration.

Ads, spam, robocalls: -1

  • They’ll beam ads at you, spam, junk-mail and text you.  You can only partially unsubscribe.

Lying and deception: -1

  • The headline “Medical Product of 2016” announces a cover of Today’s Medical Developments that features a picture of the hearing aid.  But the cover has been doctored.mags
  • The unnamed author writes, “As an Ear, Nose & Throat physician, I saw a tremendous amount of patients daily with hearing loss …  Marvel Hearing Aid has 24/7 support, and is backed by physicians and audiologists.”  But the Terms and Conditions reveal “Bargain Club Sale is not a medical professional, and does not provide medical services or render medical advice.
  • This lead me to develop a passion in creating the best hearing aid, at a reasonable price.”  But Alibaba carries what sure looks like the same hearing aid, available in lots of 50 or more.
  • “When you buy the Marvel Hearing Aid, it is guaranteed that you won’t be wasting your time with products that don’t live up to their claims …”  This is not a guarantee.  The Terms and Conditions disavow any stated or implied guarantee not contained in the Terms and Conditions–which don’t offer one.

Obfuscation: -1.  You have to drill down thru three pages to find out the price ($40).

Phony reviews: -1.  On-site testimonials by people with no last names.

Crummy product: -1

  • The marvel hearing aid did not work well was too loud and had a rooting noise wouldn’t buy again their return policy stinks,” Sue messaged me on Facebook.
  • A look-alike I found on Amazon is rated 2.6 out of 5 stars by 35 customers.  “Does make things louder but is very staticy and tinny sounding, doesn’t stay in place very well.

Overpriced: +1.  Amazon carries what sure looks like the same item, labelled “personal hearing amplifier,” for $40, the same price as Bargain Club Sale.

75% discount: +1.  False.


Total score; -6

Unauthorized charges:  I found no reports of this.  They do not accept PayPal.

Miscellaneous:  ScamAdvisor.com says “Low trust rating.  This site may not be safe to use.”

Conclusion: An online transaction with this seller looks risky.  The lack of guarantee terms and the lying make me uncomfortable.  Buy a PSA at a pharmacy; or try Amazon.

Big Brothered by Eye Cam HD spy camera

… “And then she grabbed one of my wife’s favorite ring, and put it into her pocket.

Dwayne2So reads the amazing story of Officer Dwayne Scarcy using an Eye Cam HD to discover babysitter Stacy’s thievery.  But, scrolling to the bottom of the page, I read “THE STORY DEPICTED ON THIS SITE AND THE PERSON DEPICTED IN THE STORY ARE NOT ACTUAL NEWS. RATHER, THIS STORY IS BASED ON THE RESULTS THAT SOME PEOPLE WHO HAVE USED THESE PRODUCTS HAVE ACHIEVED.”  So the whole thing is made up.

How about Officer Scarcy, then?  Yeah, he’s made up too.  The image is from Shutterstock; the seller cropped out the police car in the background.  (Honestly, I hope never to meet an officer on night patrol with a grin like that.)

On June 4, 2017, what else about this offer from DealClub.Sale isn’t real?  There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true, +1 means false, and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: +1.  None found.

Suspicious location: -1.  6549 Mission Gorge Rd #393, San Diego, CA 92120 is a mailbox shared by known scammers Perfecta Straightening Brush and Flux HD phone lenses.po

satisfactionOnerous terms: -1

  • ***ALL SALES ARE FINAL***
  • “ALL refunds or warranty replacements will be subject to a 30% restocking fee.”  I found no mention of a guarantee or warranty period.
  • If you reverse their charge on your credit card, that’s “theft.”
  • They don’t guarantee that their products meet their own specifications, nor that they are fit for any use, nor that anything they say is true.
  • You can’t sue them, join a class action that’s suing them, or join a group arbitration.

Ads, spam, robocalls: -1

  • They’ll use the information you give them to beam ads at you, spam you, junk-mail and text you.  You can opt out.
  • They’ll share it with other companies that will do the same.
  • If they sell their company, your data is part of the deal.

Lying and deception: 0.  If you lie and afterward mutter “Actually, that was a lie,” is it a lie?  The photo of the police officer is particularly disturbing.  But beyond the fictional babysitter incident I just see a few stretchers.

Obfuscation: -1.  The order form is pre-filled for a quantity of two cameras.

Phony reviews: -1.  The website poses as a review of itself.  It also contains scads of reviews by people with no last names.  That’s not a credibility crutch, it’s a wheelchair.

Crummy product: 0.  Eight Amazon customers rated a look-alike camera 2.4 out of 5 stars.  Respicio writes, “Camara worked for about two days , then it stopped loading to my computer and will not record anymore.. other then that the picture on it looked great and has a great wide view on it that gets about 60 percent of a whole room.”  Keep in mind that a scam can involve a good product.

Overpriced: +1.  DealClub.Sale is asking $40 for one spy camera.  Amazon lists several similar cameras at about the same price.

75% discount: +1.  False; it’s 50%.


Total score; -2

Unauthorized charges: EyeCam HD inherits the CREDIT CARD RISK ALERT of its DealClub.Sale mailbox address siblings Flux HD and Perfecta.  Customers have complained about receiving different merchandise than ordered, being charged more than advertised, and being charged monthly for membership in a club they didn’t join.


Conclusion:   Avoid.  If you still want a camera like this, buy one on Amazon.

laughBloopers:

  • Look at that mean sitter putting her foot on the baby!  But the giant spill on the floor, and two spills on the couch, make no sense.  Even an abusive babysitter would be smart enough not to make such an obvious mess.  She’ll still be there when the parents return; what’s she going to say about it?  Or does she clean it up too, like the Cat In The Hat?
  • Family Catches Babysitter Stealing From A Tiny Camera … !”  Did Julie keep her rings in the camera?  It’s unusual for a spy camera to have a storage compartment.

Shanghaied by FreeShipping.com

I ordered flowers for a client a few months ago and apparently to get free shipping I signed up for a monthly membership at freeshipping.com at $12.97 PER MONTH!  This is outrageous.

So writes a customer of RedEnvelope on PissedConsumer.com.  Is the FreeShipping.com “subscription shopping service” a good deal or a bad one?  The answer depends mainly on whether you signed up for it knowingly or accidentally (some victims say their credit cards were hacked or they were tricked into it).  The corridors of the Internet echo with the outraged howls of people who do business with some other company only to discover that they’ve somehow gotten entangled in a FreeShipping.com subscription.

Even the Better Business Bureau seems confused abut FreeShipping.com.  They rate it A+ despite eight negative reviews and 125 complaints.

On June 1, 2017, let’s stick our Scam-O-Meter probe in FreeShipping.com and watch the needle.  There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true, +1 means false, and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: +1.  None found.

Suspicious location: +1.  They have a real office, so one credibility point for FreeShipping.com.  I dug into the Terms of Service to find this address, PO Box 290728 Wethersfield, CT 06129-0728.   But the Better Business Bureau has another address for Clarus Commerce, the operating company: 500 Enterprise Dr Ste 2D, Rocky Hill, CT 06067-3913.  Here is their HQ, on Enterprise Drive, nestled against Dividend Brook (coincidental names?).Screen Shot 2017-06-01 at 12.36.50 PM copy

Onerous terms: -1

  • If you cancel a monthly membership, they won’t give you your money back.  They will just stop future monthly charges.  This policy offers no escape for the people who accidentally subscribed without realizing it.
  • They don’t guarantee that products you buy thru their site are fit for any use; nor that anything they say is true.
  • You can’t sue them, join a class action that’s suing them, or join a group arbitration.

Ads, spam, robocalls: 0.  Mild compared to most Privacy Policies I’ve read.

  • They’ll use the information you give them, plus what they can suck out of your browser, to spam you.  You can opt out.
  • They try to get your email address up-front.  If you give it, they’ll spam you even if you don’t register for their service.

Lying and deception: 0.  Despite the flood of confused, angry victims’ complaints, I see no lying or deception on the site.  The real story of how so many people unknowingly fall into their trap is beyond me.  Once they’re in it, they do get bled.

Obfuscation: +1.  None found.

Phony reviews: +1.  I’m leery of any testimonials featured on-site; but the ones on FreeShipping.com seem credible.

Crummy product: 0.  Experiences vary.

Overpriced: +1.  Looks to be in the same range as Amazon Prime.

75% discount: +1.  False.


Total score; +5

Unauthorized charges:  FreeShipping.com maintains that all charges are authorized.  Victims tell a different story.  So I’m turning on the CREDIT CARD RISK ALERT red light. This peculiar operation is the highest-rated site I’ve reviewed to get a red light.

From PissedConsumer.com: “Ordered parts from PartsGeek web site.  Never linked out to FreeShipping.com however, I just noticed on my credit card statement everytime I placed an order from ParrsGeek Freeshipping.com charged me a $12.97 charge.

Freeshipping.com CS rep stated I had to have filled out their info page and agreed to join their membership program. I informed the CS I never gave anyone my credit card data except Partsgeek. Freeshippping.com refused to credit back the charges but stated they could canceled my ‘Membership’.

Will call my back today and cancel the card and Partsgeek and Freeshipping.com are SCAMS!  Buyer beware!

From RipoffReport.com: “I receive a Walmart Reward by email. At the end of the personal information report I notice it wasn’t free because they ask for my credit card. I close the window. I receive a phone call explaining to me that it was a reward not a price I accept it. I went back to the window and field the blanks of credit info. I never receive the reward. But now I receive two charges of $12.97 from IC FREE SHIPPING. This is a scam they are interfering with people transactions and ilegaly charging money.

From the Better Business Bureau: “Unbeknownst to me by ordering a lamp from ************* I somehow began having debited amounts of $12.95 a month being billed to my credit card.


Conclusion: If you shop heavily online but not at Amazon, you might consider signing up for this service.  But don’t stumble into it by accepting offers of free shipping on other sites.  As an eBay customer posted, “Sometimes it pays not to click a button that looks too good.

Related: FatWallet.com, “FreeShipping.com; scam or deal?

Whacked by Primitive Survivors CorePak kit

Primitive Survivors CorePak; this box of trinkets gives about as much protection as a camo bikini.

It’s May 30, 2017.  There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true, +1 means false, and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: -1.

  • Made to address key needs when it comes to surviving and protecting yourself.
  • This kit contains all the tools and equipment anyone would need for camping, hiking, excursions and surviving in the wilderness!” enthuses The Tactical Pros with less restraint.

Let’s say you walk out the door with your Primitive Survivors CorePak in your pocket and head for the woods.  How well-prepared are you?  Let’s compare the Corepak’s contents to the time-tested 10 Essentials list of items to carry for survival in a wilderness:

  1. Navigation; detailed map, compass  /
  2. Water, and/or a way to purify water O
  3. Food O
  4. Clothing; protection from rain, insulating layers O
  5. Fire; a source of flame plus fire-starter material  /
  6. Outdoorsman’s first aid kit O
  7. Tools; knife/multitool, duct tape  X
  8. Flashlight/headlamp, spare batteries  X
  9. Sun protection; sunglasses, sunscreen  O
  10. Shelter; tarp/space blanket  O

CorePak items that didn’t make the list; whistle, tactical pen.  Also a box that wastes space and is extra weight for you to carry.  They might at least have formed the box into something useful like a mirror.

Suspicious location: -1.  1863 Pioneer Pkwy E Suite 222 Springfield, OR 97477 is a mailbox.falcon

Onerous terms: -1

  • If you return the product unused in its unopened package, they charge a 20% restocking fee.
  • If you return the product in an opened package, they charge a 25% restocking fee — if they accept it.
  • You pay the return shipping.  The Better Business Bureau has this complaint; “This company is completely unfair to expect a customer to pay return shipping on a broken item that i didnt break but rather arrived broken.
  • They don’t accept the return of clearance items.  (Everything in the CorePak is marked down; so it might be treated as a clearance item.)
  • They don’t guarantee that their products are fit for any use; nor that anything they say is true.

Ads, spam, robocalls: +1.  This doesn’t look like a problem.  “All the ways we reach out to customers are through people who have opted into our list and are interested in our products,” writes CEO Charlie Deleon Guerrero.  “Occasionally we send out newsletter promotions from sponsored companies, but we follow all can spam compliance with this and take opt-out unsubscribing requests very seriously.”

Lying and deception: +1.  None found.

Obfuscation: -1.  The terms and policy documents are entirely in upper case, making them hard to read.  And they’re way too long.

Phony reviews: -1.  Fake review sites.

Crummy product: -1.  True.

Overpriced: 0.  Probably; but there’s nothing to compare it to.

75% discount: -1.  True.


Total score; -4

Unauthorized charges: I found no reports of this.


Conclusion: Put together your own 10 Essentials kit and keep it in a small daypack.

Cussed at by CustomWritings.com

Anyone who thinks our company is scam is welcome to interview me personally in London, UK.  Otherwise shut up before i sue you in court for slander.”

So writes a self-identified co-owner of One Freelance ltd, doing business as CustomWritings.com, in EssayScam.org.  I see two grammatical errors already; but perhaps he doesn’t write essays personally.  In this post I’ll try to determine whether CustomWritings.com is trustworthy.  Other factors in your choice are up to you.  I was able to find the applicable law for Washington state USA easily by searching on “Washington State Law Plagiarism”.

It’s 27 May 2017, as they say it in England.  There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true, +1 means false, and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: +1.  None found.

Suspicious location: -1.  I have two addresses for CustomWritings.com.  One is a mailbox shared by known scammer HDZoom360.  The other is an office building.

  • 19-21 Crawford Street, Dept 706, London, W1H 1PJ
  • 37 Warren Street, London, W1T 6AD

Onerous terms: +1.  None found.

Ads, spam, robocalls: -1

  • They’ll use the information you give them, plus what they can suck out of your browser, to spam, phone and text you.  You can opt out.
  • They’ll share it with other companies that will do the same.
  • If they sell their company, your data is part of the deal.
  • Tania posted on Awriter.org; “They keep ringing me several times a day everyday and leave voice mails although I have blocked most of they’re numbers. I’m feeling harassed. It feels like they’re begging!! Leave me alone . If I wanted to place an order I would have done by now!

Lying and deception: 0.  The site is full of warnings that putting your name on a paper they write is illegal and not permitted.  But the top page of the sample paper has blanks prompting you to fill in a name, school, etc.  It’s not hard to guess what most of their customers are going to do here.

Obfuscation: +1.  None found.

Phony reviews: -1.  Featured testimonials.  Fake review site OmniPapers.com extols CustomWritings.com based wholly on the web site.

Crummy product: -1

  • Posted on Awriter.org; “You would think a $100 your paper would be A+ gave them more than 20 days, paid extra for an advanced writer and revived the most incoherent and confusing paper ever. Failed my class because of them.
  • Legitimate Writing Services advises, “We would not recommend CustomWritings.com to students, graduates and undergraduates looking for high quality papers.
  • Top Writing Reviews commented on a sample essay, “We do believe that we overpaid for the product that we received.
  • I looked over sample paper “Advantages and disadvantages of lowering the voting age to thirteen.”  Surely the company would display only its best-quality work.  This essay is described as college-level writing; I would have guessed middle school.  I found several English mistakes.  It discusses vague generalities, and it cites only one source.  Had I submitted this paper to a professor at my university, I’d expect to receive a D and an office appointment to discuss my academic future.  But if the professor were the type that grades papers by “throwing them down the stairs” it might serve.

Overpriced: 0.  Unknown.

75% discount: +1.  False.


Total score; 0

Unauthorized charges: CREDIT CARD RISK ALERT.

  • Amanda posted on Awriter.org; “My cc was charged twice by international banks. No one refunded my money and now not only am I out over $200 USD but I have no essay and a deadline next week. This site is a scam.
  • CustomWritings.com shares an address with known scammer HDZoom360.  So I assume it’s the same person or company, and it inherits HDZoom360’s credit card risk alert.
  • CustomWritings.com accepts PayPal.

Conclusion: Avoid these guys.  Check your region’s laws and your school’s policies and consider the risk.  Stick with companies based in the country where you live, and pay with PayPal.

laughBloopers: In a rebuttal to a complaint on RipoffReport.com; “We value our reputation in the paper writing service market. Therefore in future before publishing public complaints, make sure that you were really swindled, otherwise we have a right to start legal proceedings in the court of Great Britain with a case of defamation and slander. This can lead to financial losses from your side in favor of our company.”  Sounds like the same guy we started with.  Litigious!