Shipwrecked by Siren Song (Siren Saver) Alarm

If a woman runs into a store for protection from a mugger, and the store owner robs her, it’s front page news.

If 30,000* women send for a gadget for protection, and the seller robs them all, that’s still front page news — on this little blog.

*Siren Saver advertises that they’ve sold this many sirens.  On July 11, 2017, let’s look at Siren Song Alarm from SirenSaver.Com.  Contact information (see “suspicious location” below):

1-877-235-9173
Email: support@sirensaver.com

There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true, +1 means false, and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: -1

  • Luckily for me I remembered I had my Siren Saver alarm on my purse, and since I was too scared to scream for help, I quickly reached for the alarm and pulled the pin.
  • Quickly becoming one of the most sought after safety devices in America.
  • UPDATE: Due to increased social media attention, we’re currently almost sold out, so please hurry and get yours before they’re gone!

Suspicious location: -1.  7514 Girard Ave Ste #1-175, La Jolla, CA 92037, United States.  I couldn’t find this address with Google Maps.  I see a furniture store at 7509 and a dry cleaner at 7521.

Onerous terms: -1

  •  ***ALL SALES ARE FINAL***
  • ALL refunds or warranty replacements will be subject to a 30% restocking fee.
  • If you reverse their charge on your credit card, that’s “Theft.”
  • They don’t guarantee that the siren is fit for any use, nor that anything they say is true.
  • They disavow any guarantees not specified in the Terms Of Service, which contain no guarantees.  This term seems to wipe out their advertised “Satisfaction Guarantee.”

Ads, spam, robocalls: -1

  • They’ll beam ads at you, spam, phone and text you; you can only partially unsubscribe.
  • They’ll share your data with other companies that will do the same.
  • If they sell their company, your data is part of the deal.

Lying and deception: -1.  expertShill People Lifestyle, a.k.a. NationalSafetyBlog, which advertises on Facebook, manufactured an expert reviewer out of clip art.  At the bottom of the page a disclaimer admits the whole thing is fiction.  If they lie, and then mutter “That was a lie,” I’m dinging them for lying anyway.

Obfuscation: +1.  None found.

Phony reviews: -1.  The scam site drips with testimonials by made-up people.  Clicking on them just leads me to the order form, which has even more testimonials by made-up people.  The more credibility props you see, the more you should suspect they’re needed.

Crummy product: -1 From Amazon: “Don’t waste your money. This would not draw anyone’s attention you could scream louder.”  “This came with no instructions so had to figure out how to put it together. Not as loud as I thought it would be and the key ring fell apart so I had to replace it.

Overpriced: +1.  False; the $20 price is in the middle of the pack of personal sirens I looked at on Amazon.

75% discount: +1.  False.


Total score; -4

Unauthorized charges: CREDIT CARD RISK ALERT.  I found many complaints of more products sold than ordered, more money charged than advertised, and continuing unauthorized charges.

  • From #ReportScam: They did not work as advertised and I have been trying to return them, but they will not give me an adress to return them and will not refund. Now I find an additional charge in March for 19.97 plus a foreign transaction fee? I have reported to my bank’s fraud division.
  • From Ripoff Report: “I bought three Siren Song alarms and nothing more. Just received and e-mail, that went to my junk/spam folder notifying me that I have been charged $8.95 for a “VIP Membership” which would be a recurring monthly fee! Low and behold it showed up in my bank as a pending charge. I DID NOT consent to this or give anybody permission to use my card for anything other than the purchase.
  • The Better Business Bureau rates Siren Saver “F” with 18 negative reviews.  “I bought a 2 siren song and they charged me 3 different times once 39.70 and the second time for 4.95 and then 59.95 I called them they told me it was for a subscription fee but refused to tell what the subscription was for …

SirenSaver.com doesn’t accept PayPal, which isn’t too surprising.


Conclusion: Just scream.

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