Featured post

Those funny blood-sucking scammers

Since almost becoming a victim of one, I’ve gotten very interested in web scammers.  These are people who put up websites whose secondary purpose is plugging dubious products, and whose main purpose is fraud and theft.

I started posting about web scams in my regular blog; the topic became so engrossing (to me, anyway) that it was a distraction from what I usually write about.  So I’m shifting web scamming to its own blog, and this is it!

Why?

Entertainment: The earnest fantasies that web scammers spin are hilarious.  And their devious machinations show lots of talent and effort, making me wonder why they don’t just get jobs.  Laughing at them throws sunlight on them, drying up their slimy schemes.

Someone has to do it: The Better Business Bureau is mired in the 20th century.  Credit card issuers eat reversed charges, having learned the futility of pursuing nomadic and offshore operations.  The feds have bigger fish to fry.  And Amazon has lulled consumers into supposing that all web stores are honest, reliable businesses.  A few bloggers are doing what they can to warn people.  And that may be the most we can realistically accomplish.

I hope you’ll enjoy and benefit from this blog.  Please reply with your experiences, corrections and ideas.

Call to action

  • If you have a blog or a web page, it would be a public service if you would include links to posts I’ve made.  Together we can “google-bomb” the scammers by positioning honest information higher in Google search results than their fake reviews.
  • Send me a link to your blog about scamming, and I’ll include it here.
  • If you bought something from a scammer and you don’t want it, give that purchase some purpose.  Send it to me!  I’ll review it (but I’m not promising to test stuff that’s too sketchy or scary) and write about it to warn others.

8/31/16 Update:  When I set up this blog, I copied over my posts about the LUX HD450 phone lens scam and removed the links to the scam site.  And I wrote additional posts without scam site links.  Since then I’ve noticed that the same posts with scam site links get 40 times the readership as posts without links.  I’m guessing that this reflects something Google is doing to prioritize search results.  To reach and warn more people, I’m going to add links to scam sites.  I’ll color them red; click at your peril!

Advertisements

Undone by UberTorch Flashlights

Money taken out of my acct immediatiy plan to go to my bank and dispute charge right away hope i get my money back expensive lesson very angry at this company dont order anything from them ever they are a ripp off

This in response to my post about a different offering from SC Enterprises Ltd, TV Frog.  Now I see they’re selling those Chinese flashlights that you’re supposed to be able to blind and hit people with, in this case branded UberTorch.  Contact information:

SC Enterprises Ltd
19-21 Crawford Street, Dept. 706
London, UK W1H 1PJ
By Phone: +1 716 330 1335
By Email: support@ubertorch.com

September 4, 2017; There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true (bad), +1 means false (good), and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.


Ridiculous claims: -1

  • You’d have the ability to disorient any would be attacker with the push of a button.  Right, get out your flashlight, fumble it to the correct setting and shine it in his eyes.   See how far you get with this plan before you’re looking at the ceiling.
  • This light’s incredible LED technology is used by the U.S. Navy Seals, the Coast Guard, …  They’d have to go to an antique store to buy an incandescent bulb flashlight.

Suspicious location: -1.  19-21 Crawford Street, Dept. 706, London, UK W1H 1PJ is a mailbox.  It’s shared by known scam TV Frog.  po

Onerous terms: -1

  • You have 30 days from the day you ordered to return the flashlight — not from the day you receive it.
  • You have to return the flashlight unused.
  • All sales are as-is and final.  
  • They won’t give you a refund, only another flashlight or non-transferable store credit.
  • You pay the return shipping (apparently to the Netherlands)
  • They don’t guarantee that the flashlight is fit for any use; nor that anything they say is true.

Ads, spam, robocalls: +1.  With your permission, they’ll email you advertising.

Lying and deception: -1

  • With Over 20,000 Sold This Month, People Are Talking:  A peek at the source code for the web page shows that this number isn’t a variable; it was typed in with the rest of the sales pitch.  Are they going to go back and edit it every month?  I don’t think so.
<h2>With Over 20,000 Sold This Month, People Are Talking:</h2>
  • We are proud to be fulfilling great products in the USA, helping to provide jobs to American Citizens.  I found a British address; see “Suspicious location” above.  UberTorch’s governing law is BC, Canada.  ScamAdvisor reports that the web site is based in the Netherlands; and buyers of associated product TV Frog have to return their defective products to a Netherlands address.  I see no evidence of shipping from a US location.

Obfuscation: -1.  Careful with that order form; it’s pre-filled for a quantity of three flashlights ($135).

Phony reviews: +1.  Despite SC Enterprise’s claim that “People are talking” I couldn’t find any UberTorch reviews, phony or otherwise.

Crummy product: 0.  I couldn’t find any unbiased ratings.  Keep in mind that a good product can be the bait for a scam.

Overpriced: -1.  SC Enterprises prices one UberTorch at $67.  Amazon offers the UberTorch for $149.  It has no customer ratings yet.  Amazon also carries the remarkably similar Woqhain 800 lumen zoomable flashlight for $9; it’s rated 4.5 stars.

Bad service: -1.  My test email to support@ubertorch.com has gotten no reply yet after five days.


Total score; -5

Unauthorized charges: I found no reports of this.  ScamAdvisor gives UberTorch website a trust rating of “Low – may be unsafe to use.”  SC Enterprises accepts PayPal.

Conclusion: Buy a flashlight at your local hardware store.

 

 

The Scam-O-Meter web scam detector

A web scammer tries to take your money by trickery or theft.

Here’s a detailed explanation of my Scam-O-Meter web offer scoring system as of 9/717, including some minor revisions.  If this all seems too complicated, here’s how to safely ignore it; shop on Amazon!

Scored attributes

In the following list of scam-site attributes, -1 means true (bad), +1 means false (good), and 0 means undetermined.  These scores total to between -10 (deep mistrust) and +10 (highly trusted).  I show a site’s total score by the position of the needle on the Scam-O-Meter scale.

scamometer -7r

In this example, the seller has a total score of -7 and is a credit-card risk.

Ridiculous claims: Extreme stuff that common sense tells you can’t be true — that, to be honest, you want to believe.  If the product is going to revolutionize your whole life at hardly any cost or risk, that’s ridiculous.

Suspicious location: Scammers are shy about revealing their location.  What triggers a negative score here:

  • Post Office / UPS mailbox
  • Same address as a known scammer
  • Vacant lot, abandoned building, etc.
  • No resolvable physical addressfalcon

Onerous terms: Evil lurks in many Terms and Conditions documents.  If the T&C is just too hard to read, that’s “Obfuscation;” see below.

  • Unreasonable obstacles to returning a defective or unsatisfactory product for a refund.
  • Terms that undermine or contradict advertised terms (or reasonable customer expectations).
  • Terms that diminish your legal rights.

Ads, spam, robocalls: Aggressive advertising; sharing your data with other companies.

Lying and deception: If I find that a seller lies about anything, I ding them a point whether or not it seems important; lying doesn’t make for trustworthiness.  (I overlook severe ignorance here, but laugh at it elsewhere.).

covers

Obfuscation: A website that’s designed to distract you, confuse you or hide important information.

Phony reviews: 

  • Testimonials.  If the reviewers don’t have full names, or their photos turn out to be clip-art, they’re phony.  Otherwise they’re only probably phony, so I’ll let it slide.
  • Reviews by shills; these are just a complicated form of advertising.

Crummy product: Nobody wants one of these.  But keep in mind that a scam might use a good product as bait.  In that case, it’s the way the product is sold that’s evil.

Overpriced: I don’t insist on the cheapest price.  But a price that’s two or three times the going rate on Amazon gets a -1 from me.

Bad service: The seller ignores emails and doesn’t answer their phone.  So, their assurances of customer help and easy refunds are empty promises.  (This is a new criteria.)

A 75% discount is no longer a criteria.  But I’ll mention any supposed huge discounts under “Lying and Deception.”

Unscored attribute

Unauthorized charges:  If I find that a seller is stealing from credit card accounts, then their score no longer matters, because I absolutely mistrust them.  I show this result with a red stop-light labelled “CREDIT CARD RISK ALERT” on the Scam-O-Meter.  Unauthorized charges include:

  • Charging a higher price than advertised
  • Charging more than once for the same item
  • An unannounced automatic subscription to an auto-ship service (typical follow-up to a “free trial”)
  • A monthly membership fee for a phony “discount club”
  • Failure to use HTTPS (encrypted) protocol to protect your credit-card data from snoopers
  • If the seller’s address is the same as that of a known scammer who’s stealing from credit card accounts, I consider him the same person and turn on the red light.

 

Blinded by Night Sight HD glasses

I have ordered Night sight glasses from Elite Savings club for 29 $ (Buy 1 and get 2). … but they have charged me 59 $ plus 20$ shipment and task. The worst thing is that those glasses are terrible, they are like ordinary sun glasses, I can’t see anything in the night with them.

This is from a reader in Croatia.  8/30/17 update; the company behind this offer has been changed to Bargain Club Sale.  Contact information:

LIZA SERIES LLC
5173 Waring Rd #12,
San Diego, CA 92120, United States
phone: 1-877-885-4114
email: support@bargainclub.sale
In the UK: HDE Trading LTD.
Kemp House 152-160 City Road
London EC1V 2NX

Updated August 30, 2017: There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true (bad), +1 means false (good), and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: -1.  “Night Sight HD is voted the #1 solution for safe driving in the evening and night …”  By whom?

Suspicious location: -1.  5173 Waring Rd #12, San Diego, CA 92120 is a mailbox.  It’s shared by several other dubious Bargain Club Sale enterprises.corporate

Onerous terms: -1guarantee

  • Despite being way too long for a pair of sunglasses, the terms say nothing about a guarantee/warranty period.
  • They charge a 30% restocking fee on warranty and satisfaction returns, unless they shipped you a damaged or wrong product.
  • They don’t guarantee that the glasses are suitable for any use; nor that anything they say is true.
  • You can’t sue them, join a class-action suit, or join a group arbitration.

Ads, spam, robocalls: -1

  • They’ll beam ads at you and spam you; you can opt out.
  • They’ll share your data with other companies that will do the same.
  • If they sell their company, your data is part of the deal.

Lying and deception: -1

  • The Night Sight HD fits easily over prescription lenses and designed to be overlay on glasses while driving.”  Anybody who wears prescription glasses knows that putting on a second pair of glasses is uncomfortable.  Clip-ons that fasten to the front of prescription frames are tolerable, but not a complete second pair.
  • …it guarantees enhanced clarity instantly!”  A careful reader will suspect that this is not a guarantee, and she will be correct.  Buried in the T&Cs I find:
All product specifications, performance data and other information on the Website is for informational and illustrative purposes only, and do not constitute a guarantee or representation that the products will conform to such specifications or performance data.
  • On the first page they show a price of $29.95 for a pair of glasses plus a “free” pair.  But on the order form, in faint print, they show the real price; $59.90.  My correspondent confirmed this price.  So much for “Free.”

price

Obfuscation: -1.  Once you go to the order form, you can’t escape it; your browser’s back-button is disabled.

Phony reviews: -1.  Testimonials by people with no last names.

Crummy product: 0.  All I can tell for sure about NightSight HD glasses is that they are polarized.  So are lots of other glasses.

Overpriced: -1.  Elite Savings Club is charging $30 per pair (see “Lying and deception” above).  Amazon has several offerings in this price range; in particular, polarized clip-ons for $9.

75% discount: +1.  False.

Total score; -7

Unauthorized charges: CREDIT CARD RISK ALERT.

  • Elite Savings Club doesn’t accept PayPal.  And the reason is clear; they’re going to charge twice what you probably expected.
  • It looks like they’re running a hidden subscription scam.  On the bottom of the order form, in small print; “This order includes a FREE 30 Day pass to Exclusivity Store.”  Remember how “Free” panned out on the free second pair of glasses.  And what happens after 30 days?  Buried in the T&Cs I find; “Your request for termination, whether by phone or email, will be processed within 3-5 business days …

Advice: AllAboutVision.com advises regular eye exams for older drivers, in particular if they have diabetes.  The web page includes specifications for recommended night-driving prescription glasses.

Conclusion: Buy some polarized glasses at your pharmacy.  There you can be sure what they’ll cost, try them on, buy just one pair, and easily return them if you don’t like them.

Soul eaten by RadSpeed Detector Pro

scamometer 3Hill, 26, an Afghanistan war veteran, was killed March 9 at his apartment complex outside Atlanta,” reports CNN.  And then, bizarrely, RadSpeed Detector Pro ripped off Anthony Hill’s picture and used it as “Jimmy B.” of North Carolina in a testimonial.

 

Contact information:

RadSpeed Detector Pro
Office: 585 Bryant St. San Francisco, CA 94107
Returns: 10024 N Taryne St., Hayden, ID 83835
Website: BuyRadSpeedPro.com
Email: support@radspeedpro.com
Phone: (415) 329-0337

August 16, 2017; There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true (bad), +1 means false (good), and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: +1.  None found.

Suspicious location: +1.  585 Bryant St., San Francisco, CA 94107 isn’t pretty, but it’s a real building.  Marina Auto Body (now closed, says Yelp) and Secureway Auto Body and Glass also work out of this address.hq

Onerous terms: +1.  None found.

Ads, spam, robocalls: +1.  You can opt in to receive emailed advertising, and opt out.

Lying and deception: +1.  None found.

Obfuscation: -1.  Messages about other people buying detectors keep popping up on top of the web page.

Phony reviews: -1.  In addition to the sad abuse of Anthony Hill’s photo, two more fake testimonials by made-up people feature pictures lifted from the web.

Crummy product: 0.  I couldn’t find any unbiased reviews.

Overpriced: +1.  RadSpeed Detector Pro is asking $105.  Amazon doesn’t handle RadSpeed, but offers radar detectors from $30 to over $600.

75% discount: -1.  True.

Total score; 3

Unauthorized charges: I found no reports of this.  RadSpeed doesn’t accept PayPal.

Photo misuse:  I think nobody would deliberately do this.  I think that either RadSpeed hired an incompetent web designer or their web site has been vandalized.  I emailed the company on July 29 (18 days before posting this) pointing out that they’re misusing a murder victim’s picture; I received no reply.  Does this indicate the kind of service a customer would receive?

Conclusion: This seems like an okay business, but it has serious sensitivity and responsiveness issues.

 

 

 

Dislocated by Virtue Shop ToePro bunion corrector

    Product 😦 saddened by it broke away after 1 hours

This from AliExpress shopper “TR.”  (Virtue Shop used the same photo as did AliExpress, so I assume it’s the same bunion corrector.)  On August 13, 2017 let’s stick Virtue Shop’s lower extremity in the Scam-O-Meter and see how it measures up.  Contact information:

contactvirtueshop@gmail.com

There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true (bad), +1 means false (good), and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: -1

  • If not treated, the condition can lead to severe health complications.”  According to the Mayo Clinic, possible complications are bursitis, hammertoe and metatarsalgia.  Unpleasant, certainly; but severe?
  • 60% off?  (35 – 24 ) / 35 = 31% off.

Carmen_SandiegoSuspicious location: -1.  Virtue Shop’s web site doesn’t reveal its location.  ScamAdvisor says “Site is Canada-based, but real location is being hidden,” listing an anonymous Privacy Inc. client identifier number as Virtue Shop’s owner.  The Terms of Service say that the governing law is that of Dublin, Ireland.

Onerous terms: -1

  • For a refund, you have to return the product within 14 days from your ordernot from the date you receive it.  Virtue Shop advises, “Allow up to 3 – 4 weeks for delivery.”
  • For a refund, you have to return the product unused in its original package.
  • Some(?) health and personal care items can’t be returned.
  • Marked-down items can’t be returned.  Notice that the product is marked down.
  • You have to pay the shipping on items you return.  (Maybe to Ireland!)
  • They don’t guarantee that the product will meet your expectations; nor that anything they say is true.

Ads, spam, robocalls: +1.  If you opt in, they’ll email you advertising.  You can opt out.

Lying and deception: -1

Virtue Shop lies

 

Obfuscation: -1.  Random chunks of Latin are sprinkled around the web page, like “Donec eros tellus, scelerisque nec, rhoncus eget, laoreet sit amet, nunc. Ut sit amet turpis.”  They don’t mean anything; they’re just window-dressing.

Phony reviews: -1.  They claim a rating of 4.9 stars based on 30 votes. But there’s no way to vote.

Crummy product: +1.  This seems like an adequate product as a first effort for temporary relief.  AliExpress carries a 4.7 star rating based on 63 reviews.  134 Amazon reviewers gave a quite similar item 3.9 stars.

Overpriced: -1.  Virtue Shop is asking $24.  Amazon offers what sure looks like the same product for $10.  AliExpress is selling them for $0.55.  They operate out of China, but at least you know their location.

75% discount: +1.  False.

Total score; -4

Unauthorized charges: I found no reports of this.  The “Guaranteed Safe Checkout” omits PayPal as an accepted form of payment.

Conclusion: Good; buy this on Amazon.  Better; go to your local pharmacy and ask them for advice.  Best; see your doctor.


Bloopers:laughbloopers

Busted! Inferno Lighter 2017

It will help you in times when you need it most when you are on picnic or lost in wild remote areas, it will help you find your way in some of the craziest nights.

So HealthyUSA extolls the Inferno Lighter.  I posted an article about them a year ago.  Today I noticed their ad on Facebook; so I guess it’s time to take another look.  Has anything changed?  And, after over a year of blogging about web scams, will I see anything new?  Contact information:

Inferno Lighter
8894 Towne Centre Dr. #105-553
San Diego, CA 92122
support@infernolighter.com
1-844-756-0640

August 8, 2017: There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true (bad), +1 means false (good), and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: -1.  

  • Made, and designed by a team of engineers” Good to know it wasn’t a team of baristas or a rugby team.
  • “Did you know that recent studies have also proved butane can also be the cause of cancer?”  Hmm, something to think about as you inhale that tobacco smoke.

Suspicious location: -1.  8894 Towne Centre Dr. #105-553, San Diego, CA 92122 is a mailbox.  This address is shared by La Creme Skin Care; ScamGuard lists 23 complaints against La Creme, roundly criticized for unauthorized charges.  hq

Onerous terms: -1

  • They’ll take your money when you order a lighter, but they won’t “accept” your order until they ship it.
  • If you want a refund, you “may” need to return your unused lighter within 30 days from your order — not from the day you received it.
  • Reversing their charge on your credit card is “theft.”
  • They don’t guarantee that their products are any good, nor that anything they say is true.
  • You can’t sue them, join a class action that’s suing them, or join a group arbitration.

Ads, spam, robocalls: -1  

  • They’ll beam ads at you and spam you.  You can opt out.
  • They’ll share your data with other companies that will do the same.
  • If they sell their company, your data is part of the deal.

Lying and deception: -1.  These guys have Photoshop, and they know how to use it.

cover

row-2-model copy

Obfuscation: -1 

  • Careful with the order form; it’s pre-filled for five lighters ($145).
  • The Terms And Conditions are unnecessarily long and legal.

Phony reviews: -1.  Clicking the testimonials just leads to the order form.  Web publisher reviews of the Inferno Lighter such as BoldSurvivalist and PreppingPros are really advertising.

Crummy product: 0.  Five Amazon customers rated it 3.9 stars, but some of the reviews look fake.  I liked this one-star review; “Cool concept, got shocked twice though. Makes very annoying high pitched sound.”  Keep in mind that a scam can involve a good product.

Overpriced: -1.  Inferno is asking $56 for one lighter.  Amazon carries Inferno Lighters for $20.  Other electric lighters on Amazon run from $15 to $29.

75% discount: -1.  True.

Total score; -9

Unauthorized charges: The Better Business Bureau rates Inferno Lighters B+, with two resolved complaints.  Inferno Lighter doesn’t accept PayPal.  I found no complaints of credit card fraud, but the association with La Creme is troubling.

Electrical hazard: As I pointed out in 2016, users of similar lighters have reported that if you touch the “flame” you’ll get a powerful shock.

Conclusion: If you like to show off gadgets, you might enjoy buying this type of lighter on Amazon.


laughBloopers: HealthyUSA shills Inferno as a “Tactical” lighter.  After the apocalypse, how will you recharge it?  “Just imagine you are stuck in jungle and you need to light any substance immediately and all you are left with is a single match stick either you give your best shot or bear with the misery, horrible, isn’t it?

What changed in a year?  In 2016 the order form disabled my browser’s back button; now it doesn’t.  Wise move; taking over peoples’ computers doesn’t gain any trust.

Dumbfounded by IntelligenceRX

These pills are supposed to make you smart.  But the sellers don’t seem to be taking them?

IntelligenceRX doesn’t look like a major threat to online consumers, but it does look like it would be entertaining to look at it some more.  Contact information:

Intelligencerx
PO Box 41542
St.Petersburg FL 33710
Email: support@IntelligenceRX.com
Phone: 888-285-2795

August 5, 2017; There may be nothing illegal or wrong with the following business practices. But they suggest that the seller is not to be trusted. I’m using my Scam-O-Meter scoring system; -1 means true (bad), +1 means false (good), and 0 means undetermined. I penalize the seller for statements made by shills.

Ridiculous claims: -1

  • Get a leg up on your co-workers with the IntelligenceRX Brain Pill today!” … “Imagine how impressed your boss will be with your when you outperform all your slower-thinking co-workers.
  • Stop the decrease in cognitive functioning that comes with age for good!

Suspicious location: -1.   PO Box 41542, St.Petersburg FL 33710 is a post office box.  What else is going on here:

… okay you get the picture.

Onerous terms: -1

  • guaranteeTo get a refund, you have to return the product within 30 days from your order — not from the day you receive it.
  • You have to return the product unused and unopened.  This will make trying it “for free” rather difficult.
  • They charge a $15 per bottle restocking fee.
  • You pay the shipping.
  • If you reverse their charge on your credit card, that’s fraud.
  • They don’t guarantee that anything they say is true.

Ads, spam, robocalls: 0.  Despite having way more lawyer-babble than a typical Privacy Policy, IntelligenceRX’s Privacy Policy says less.  The only sentence that matters; “We will not sell, share, or rent your personal information to any third party or use your e-mail address for unsolicited mail. Any emails sent by this Company will only be in connection with the provision of agreed services and products.”  But what does “Agreed” mean?

Lying and deception: -1

  • Clinically proven to improve focus and energy.”  IntelligenceRX cites four sources in the small print at the bottom of the second page:
  1. A summary of a proposed method for figuring out whether new drugs are any good.
  2. An experiment that involved rats but not IntelligenceRX.
  3. A summary of stuff we think we know about traditional Indian berbs.
  4. Another experiment that involved rats but not IntelligenceRX.
  • For a limited time, you can try IntelligenceRX for free!”  Dictionary.com defines “For free” as “Without charge.”  See “Onerous Terms” above.

Obfuscation: -1

  • In order to find out the price, you have to give your personal information.
  • Hurry!  Only 250 bottles sent per day.”  “As of <date> we currently have the product in stock.”  “10 people are viewing this product right now.”  “We cannot guarantee supply.”  etc.

Phony reviews:  -1.  Web publishers are shilling for IntelligenceRX and embarrassing themselves.

  • laughFrom GenuixTrial.com: “If you are willing to use this supplement, visit online and check the offers or deals on its official website.  Hurry up and get its bottle, until the stock lasts.  Go for it right now.
  • PRFree.org says: “To prevent complaints from your sidekick toss around a IntelligenceRx. It is new. This column will take a look at why IntelligenceRx shopping is so difficult. It might be IntelligenceRx biggest example. That will change your life.
  • Focus Nutra seems enthusiastic, but confused.  “… this formula will help prevent the cause of Alzheimer’s it is not the cure to this disease.

Testimonials with photos make it easy to spot the fraud.  This one was lifted from OffshoreEnergyToday.com .

ceo

Crummy product: 0.  I couldn’t find an unbiased review.  Keep in mind that a scam can involve a good product.

Overpriced: 0.  IntelligenceRX wants $54 for a bottle of pills; I couldn’t figure out how many pills it contains, nor the recommended dosage.  Amazon carries it for $50, they don’t show the pill count either.

75% discount: +1.  False.

Total score; -5

Unauthorized charges: CREDIT CARD RISK ALERT.

  • The Better Business Bureau rates sister company Revival Beauty “F” with 91 complaints.  They run a free-sample / auto-ship racket.  Complaints concern samples not received, repeated unauthorized charges, fake tracking numbers. etc.  The company’s response to many of them is that the customer’s problem is really with some other company.  “We received your BBB complaint by Mistake. Hashtag Fulfillment is a third party logistics company, who manages inventory and ships product for our clients. Unfortunately, that is the extent of our relationship with our clients. We do not manage billing between our clients and their customers.”  Hashtag Fulfillment uses the same post office box as do Revival Beauty and IntelligenceRX.
  • I’ve found the statements “Rush my trial!” “IntelligenceRX free trial” “Accept offer” and “Claim your bottles today!” on the web site.  They imply that a free-trial / auto-ship scam may be underway that could lead to repeated unauthorized charges.  But the terms say nothing about a subscription or auto-ship.

IntelligenceRX does not accept PayPal.

Conclusion: I’ve found that frequent vigorous exercise makes me feel smart and energetic.

Bloopers: This whole site is a blooper.  But as an encore here is the ingredient list: “IntelligenceRX Proprietary Blend: Standardized 80% IntelligenceRX 1000mg.